Cuisine

The 10 most popular dishes in Japan

Today we will talk about traditional Japanese foods and dishes. As most know already, Japan has dishes that are absolutely unique and wonderful. Yet the first thing that comes to mind when you think about it is fish and rice. This is why we will give you the top 10 traditional dishes of Japan, to give you another cultural vision, but also to help you choose what you will eat in the restaurant.

So here are 10 of my favorite Japanese dishes!

1.Sushi and sashimi

I will begin with the most famous but also the most associated with Japan : sushi and sashimi. Sushi is famous all over the world. They are composed of a vinegared rice (which is created from vinegar, salt and sugar) mixed with different ingredients such as fish of different varieties of vegetables, but also sheets of dried seaweed called Nori, etc., You can catch them with chopsticks and dip them into the soy sauce or wasabi (a very spicy japanese condiment ), or sometimes even both at the same time. It is a true mix of flavours in your mouth ! Depending on The Shape of sushi and its ingredients, sushi can be : maki sushi, nigiri sushi, temakis sushi, and many more.

The sashimi is basically raw fish or seafood, served with wasabi, soy sauce and most often with the radishes sliced on the side. Although the term sashimi is Japanese, it has been widely francized, and literally means “carved body”.

2. The ramen

Ramen is one of the most popular Japanese dishes. It is a bowl of noodles, made from wheat, served with soy sauce or miso soup and mixed with many kinds of foods. The most typical are pieces of pork, green onion, seaweed and eggs. It is difficult to compare the flavours of this dish with those you regularly consume : they are unique. The ramen is very tasty, although it often depends on the place or restaurant where you order it. The way the pork is cooked sometimes makes it so soft and supple that it breaks in half as soon as you catch it with your chopsticks. If you order a bowl of ramen with a bowl of rice, you can be sure that you will be satisfied once this meal is over. I mean, if you can.

3. Tempura

shrimps tempura (battered fried shrimps) with vegetable

Tempuras are a fried Japanese snack made from seafood and vegetables. However, it is not uncommon to find tempura from chicken and fish, seasoned with a sauce made of ginger, sugar and soy sauce. For vegetables, you can find plenty of different varieties. This snack must be small enough to be eaten in one bite, and as far as frying is concerned, it must not be too oily. Tempuras are served with Tentsuyu sauce, composed of dashi, mirin and soy sauce.

4. Kare raisu (rice with curry)

Kare Raisu is also a very famous dish in Japan. It is simply curry rice, but the taste is very different from what one can know in France. Japanese curry rice requires different varieties of meat and vegetables. Traditionally used vegetables are onion, carrot and sweet potato. The meat used is usually chicken, pork, beef and sometimes duck. As for spices, it is raised to your choice: sweet, normal or very spicy. Japanese curry rice is usually very spicy !
What sauce will you choose ?

5. Okonomiyaki

japanese pizza (okonomiyaki) on wooden table

It’s a mixture made from flour, yam and egg, but you can add whatever you want. Ingredients are usually green onion, beef, shrimp, vegetables, cheese, mochi, and squid. Okonomiyaji is cooked on a hot plate that looks like a grill. In some Japanese restaurants, the chef comes to cook it directly on your table and you can even participate in the recipe by adding your own ingredients. This dish looks like a patty, cooked on both sides : its cooking is therefore a bit stressful or even funny, especially when it is the first time you make it.

6. Shabu Shabu

Hot Pot for Japanese Shabu Shabu and Sukiyaki – Japanese Food Style

Shabu shabu is the Japanese fondue par excellence. For this dish, different varieties of meat and seafood are used, these are mainly the sweetest in taste. They are accompanied by vegetables, and tofu and sometimes noodles. For the taste, it is very simple ! You catch a piece of meat and/or a piece of vegetable with your chopsticks and immerse it in a bowl filled with hot water. Once cooked, dip it in a sesame sauce and taste it with rice. It’s delicious !

7. Miso soup

curry ramen with pork and egg – japanese noodle

Miso soup is served as a side dish in most Japanese meals. It is a soup made from miso paste (fermented soybean shoots) and dashi. Inside, you can find pieces of tofu, wakane seaweed, onion and sometimes even vegetables such as sweet potatoes, carrots or radishes. This dish is never served as the main dish. It is often accompanied, if not all the time, by a bowl of rice or other dishes.

8. Yakitori

It’s a Japanese skewer. As its name indicates (tori means-volatile), it was originally a chicken skewer. Now you can find yakitori made of pork, beef and even fish. These kebabs are a mix of vegetables and meat cooked on the grill, dipped in a teriyaki sauce. It is also a very famous dish in Japan.

This is often the choice chosen by tourists traveling to Japan because the flavors of the yakitori skewers are very similar to those of the Western cuisine. They are recommended for those who don’t yet dare to venture into strong Japanese flavors and who are looking for a great taste and nutritious snack food.

9. Onigiri

Japanese food Onigiri white rice formed into triangular or cylindrical shapes and often wrapped in nori.

It’s the most popular snack in Japan. No matter what time it is, where you are, if you are hungry or a little creep and you run out of time, you buy an onigiri. Onigiris are small rice balls seasoned in different ways, sometimes filled with chicken, vegetables, fish, pork or covered with a nori seaweed or even covered with an egg. You have a huge choice of varieties and flavors ! In addition, it is a very inexpensive dish that can be found everywhere: supermarkets, grocery stores, even shops that only make onigiris.

10. Udon

The udon is a thick noodle made of wheat flour. In general, the odons are served with soy sauce and mirin sauce. Most of the time, they’re served with chives. The shape and thickness depends on the person who cooks them. Udon can be eaten cold or very hot, and is very popular in Japan. It is a dish that is appreciated by the fact that it is eaten and cooked very quickly, and thus makes students or hard workers happy. There are special places in the udon where you can eat: they are very often full, but don’t worry, you will quickly find a seat on which to sit !

Cuisine #Recipes

How Much Nutrition in a Bowl of Cherries?

CHERRIES photo

 

It’s only mid-May, but I’m already tasting summer. Surely it’s evident in Central Florida’s recent days of sweltering heat. However, I’m talking about the seasonal treats making their debuts in the marketplaces around here. Like crisp, cool watermelon; juicy heirloom tomatoes in all their glorious shapes and vibrant color spectrum (whomever coined them “ugly” was a fool); and last but certainly not least – sweet, succulent CHERRIES.

They have a pretty short growing season, so they need to be celebrated while they’re with us. And cherries have MUCH to be celebrated! Gobble ’em down while you can, from now until about late August (in North America).

Cherries are chocked full of a very important pigment called anthocyanin. Anthocyanin gives them their rich, red color, indicating that they’re oozing with antioxidants. Interestingly enough, it’s this antioxidant benefit produced by the anthocyanin that not only counters those icky free-radicals, it’s like eating your sunscreen and protects against ultraviolet radiation. Just like it gaurds the flesh of these little gems, eating them will help protect yours, too.

If the whole antioxidant thing weren’t neat enough, anthocyanins also contain melatonin, a horomone typically produced from our brain’s pineal gland that helps regulate our sleep cycle. They are also natural pain relievers, anti-inflammatory, anti-aging, and load a big gun for aiding with weight loss. Because of anthocyanins’ anti-inflammatory properties, loading up on some cherries can help shrink fat cells and lower cholesterol levels (provided you aren’t washing them down with a quarter-pounder with cheese).

As an added bonus, cherries are high in vitamin C, fiber, beta-carotene (nearly 20 times more than blueberries or strawberries, in fact), potassium, magnesium, iron, and folate. Bottom line…cherries ROCK.

And by the way, in no remote stretch does anything I just said pertain to those syrupy, overly-processed maraschino cherries in the jar that you use to make your Shirley Temple. Those should be totally avoided like the plague, unless you want to replace all the aforementioned nutritional fabulosities with sulphur dioxide brine (a bleaching agent), calcium or lime by-products, artificial dyes, flavorings, and high-fructose corn syrup. Eeu.

Oh and as you may know Japanese culture is very much revolving arround cherries and cherry blossoms. No matter if you are into Japanese cuisines or not you probably love cherries too, so take a look at the easy cherry shake recipe I share below.

Simple Cherry Chocolate Shake

  • 1 1/2 cups fresh-frozen pitted cherries
  • 1 1/4 cups almond milk
  • 1 vanilla bean
  • 1 tbs agave
  • pinch of sea salt

Blend all ingredients into Vita-Mix or blender until smooth. Add less almond milk for a thicker shake. Spoon over desired amount of chocolate sauce.

Chocolate sauce:

  • 1/2 cup cacao nibs
  • 1/2 cup agave
  • 1/4 cup maple syrup
  • 1 tbsp coconut butter
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt

Blend all ingredients in a food processor until very smooth.

Enjoy!

Cuisine

How to make a Japanese Matcha tea at home?

People use Matcha tea for many purposes. In Japan, traditional tea ceremony rituals use the best tea note to create a drink that cleans both body and mind.
In Western cultures, matcha is often prepared as a casual breakfast, hot or cold. Californians and Arizonans, for example, tend to make iced matcha tea during long, hot summers in the southwestern United States.

The making of a cup of matcha tea is a delicate process, relaxing in its simplistic ritual, routine but not banal. The best part is at the end. You are rewarded with the benefits of a refreshing cup of tea. There are many ways to approach a matcha tea preparation, depending on the tools you have at your disposal. Below, we will see together the different ways to make Matcha tea.
How to make a Matcha tea with traditional Japanese tea utensils.

The traditional method of preparing a matcha tea is very simple. The most intense part, the whipping, is much easier with when done with a whisk.

Important Note…If you try to use Western utensils to prepare your matcha tea, it’s likely that this tea will not turn as you hoped. We strongly advise that you obtain and use the traditional Japanese matcha tea utensils described below as they will enrich your matcha experience and increase your chances of making the perfect bowl of Matcha green tea.

 

Here’s what you need:

  • Chashaku: a bamboo spoon in The Shape of a ladle.
  • Chasen: bamboo whisk (get your Chasen here).
  • Chawan: flat bottom tea bowl (get your Chawan here).
  • A food sieve or strainer.

Ingredients for one person:

– 1 to 2 teaspoons of “ceremonial” matcha premium tea powder scooped and measured using Chashaku (get your Matcha here). It is preferable to find tge best quality matcha possible from a trusted brand.

– 300 ml of hot water.

 

Steps in preparing traditional matcha tea:

  1. Rinse your Chawan bowl with cold water.
  2. Place your sieve over your bowl and with the Chashaku, put 1 to 2 spoons of your matcha green tea powder into the small sieve.
  3. Use your Chasen to squeeze the powder. This step serves to break the lumps, and produces a creamier Cup with more foam.
  4. Bring 300 ml of water to a boil. Cool to about 70° C (if you can’t measure the temperature, wait about one to two minutes after removing the lid of the kettle to let the Heat go).
  5. Pour the water into the bowl. Tighten the bowl tightly and whip the matcha quickly from top to bottom, in The Shape of ” m ” or “w”, works very well, until it is sparkling.
  6. Stop when an emerald green foam form is formed and then serve in a tea cup. Enjoy!

For less foam and smoother tea, whip more gently with a smoother wrist movements. Smooth matcha tea has slightly different flavors and aroma than frothy matcha.

How to make a Matcha tea with pastry utensils

In the absence of traditional tea utensils, as long as you have a metal whisk or immersion blender, you can always make your own matcha. But know that the end result will not be as perfect as a cup of matcha tea traditionally made.

Here’s what you need:

  • A teaspoon.
  • A metal whip.
  • Deep ceramic bowl.

Ingredients for one person:

– 1 teaspoon of matcha premium tea powder.
– 300 ml of hot water.

The steps of preparing a matcha tea:

 

  1. Rinse your bowl with cold water.
  2. Add a little bit of cold water.
  3. Put 1 teaspoon of your matcha green tea powder in your bowl.
  4. With your metal whip, gently whip the powder. This step is used to break the lumps.
  5. Bring 30 cl (300 ml) of water to a boil. Cool to about 70° C (if you can’t measure the temperature, wait about one to two minutes after removing the lid of the kettle to let the Heat go).
  6. Pour the water into the bowl. Tighten the bowl tightly and whip the matcha quickly from top to bottom, in The Shape of ” m ” or “w”, works very well, until it is sparkling.
  7. Stop when an emerald green foam form is formed and then serve in a tea cup. Enjoy!

Because a metal whisk is not specifically designed to aerate matcha tea, this method will usually produce a less foamy cup of tea.

How to make a matcha tea with a thicker texture  with traditional tea utensils

If the flavor of matcha tea normally prepared is not enough for you, a thicker matcha can bring you the flavor or texture you are looking for.

Here is how to make this variation:

  1. Rinse your Chawan bowl with cold water.
  2. Place your sieve over your bowl and with the Chashaku, put 3 spoons of your matcha green tea powder into the small sieve.
  3. Use your Chasen to squeeze the powder. This step is used to break the lumps.
  4. Bring 30 ml of water to a boil. Cool to about 70° C (if you can’t measure the temperature, wait about one to two minutes after removing the lid of the kettle to let the Heat go).
  5. Pour half in the bowl.Do not add all the water at once or the powder will be agglomerated.
  6. Make slow circles with your whip to carefully combine matcha with water.
  7. Add the remaining water and whisk in small circles until the tea is completely smooth.
  8. Then serve in a teacup. Enjoy!

How to make a matcha latte tea to get your day off to a good start

Here is how to make a matcha latte tea

There is nothing better than a latte in the morning. The only problem with traditional slats is that they are packed with caffeine, calories and fat that are not nutritious for you. Matcha green tea is a healthy alternative to help you kick-start your day. The coffee gives you a boost on the moment and leaves you to pick up an hour or two later. A matcha is a much better choice going from 4 to 6 hours.

If you’re after an alternative to a cup of coffee every morning, a matcha latte could be what you were looking for.

Here’s what you need:

  •  Chashaku or a teaspoon.
  •  Chasen.
  •  Chawan (tea bowl with a flat bottom).
  •  milk frother.
  •  little food sieve.
  • a  tea cup
  •  large glass

Ingredients for one person:

2 teaspoons of matcha tea (3 teaspoons using Chashaku).
1 tablespoon of organic honey.
10 cl of cold or hot water.
20 cl of cold or hot milk.

The steps of preparing a matcha latte tea:

  1. Rinse your bowl with cold water.
  2. Place your sieve over your bowl and put 2 teaspoons (or 3 teaspoons using Chashaku) of your matcha green tea powder into the small sieve.
  3. Use your chashaku (bamboo spoon in The Shape of a ladle) to squeeze the powder. This step is used to break the lumps.
  4. Add 10 cl of water and 1 tablespoon of organic honey.
  5. Using your Chasen (Japanese bamboo whisk), whip into small circles until the tea is completely smooth.
  6. Pour your tea into your cup of tea.
  7. Then pour 20 cl of milk in a large glass and with the help of your milk sparkling wine, you will emulsify the milk until you get something sparkling enough.
  8. Then with a large tablespoon, hold the foam while pouring the milk into your coffee cup.
  9. Once all the milk has been poured, release the milk foam on top.
  10. You can add a little decoration by sprinkling on the top of a little matcha green tea powder.

Enjoy!

So, is Matcha tea really good for you!

Matcha tea in its many forms is an excellent supplement to a healthy diet. Packed with more nutrients than typical green tea due to its manufacturing of whole leaves, matcha is filled with vitamins, minerals and especially polyphenols. What are antioxidants linked to better regulation of blood sugar, lower blood pressure and a reduced risk of heart disease and cancer. Matcha tea is also elevated in EGCG, proven to increase cardiovascular and metabolic health.

As for everything, keep in mind that quality is the key to enjoy the real and full benefits of Matcha green tea.

Cuisine

Mitarashi Kushi Dango (みたらし団子) Recipe

Dango mochi is a Japanese wagashi dessert: a small ball of sticky rice paste, usually served with shoyu caramel sauce (with soy sauce). Yummy and Original!

Difficulty: Easy
Preparation time: 30 min
Cooking time: 10 minutes

Ingredients

(For 7 skewers)

For the shoyu caramel sauce:

  • 8 cl of water
  • 80 g sugar powder
  • 1 tablespoon of Shoyo sauce (soy sauce))
  • 1 tablespoon mirin
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch (Maizena type))

For the mochi paste:

  • 200 g sticky rice flour
  • 25 cl of water
  • 80 g sugar powder
  • corn starch (Maizena type)

Preparation

1. Prepare the shoyu caramel sauce: mix all the ingredients and cook 3 to 5 min until the mixture thickens.

Be careful, not to make them too sweet as the dango mochi does not contain sugar in the dough, but they are served with quite sweet caramelized sauce.

2. For mochi paste: mix the rice flour, water and sugar in a glass bowl. Cook this mixture for 30 seconds in the microwave at medium power (about 600 Watts). Remove from the oven, mix the mixture with a spoon and put 30 seconds back in the microwave. Continue to alternate between cooking and mixing until the dough is thick but remains supple and sticky. (You will have to cook at least 5 to 6 times).

3. The mochi paste cools very quickly. It needs to stay warm, so you can work on it easily. Divide it into small balls, about 21 total and place them on a plate sprinkled with cornstarch.
4. Cook the dango mochi in a large pot of boiling water, not salted. Let them cook for about 5 minutes, until the balls rise to the surface.
5. Drain them and dip them in ice water. Drain them again and prick them on wooden spikes, three by three.
6. Serve the dango mochi with the shoyu caramel sauce.

Mochi paste was originally made from crushed cooked rice. But this traditional recipe takes quite a long time to implement. There is now ready made mochi flour sold at stores, which is perfect for making daifuku mochi too. But you can also use sticky rice flour for that purpose.

Cuisine

Japanese Plum Wine (Umeshu)

Umeshu is an alcoholic beverage in which Japanese plums are macerated(soaked) for a long time. It’s very common in Japan.

Umeshu, a Japanese plum Wine

The umeshu is an alcoholic drink made from Neutral Alcohol, shochu or sake in which Japanese plums, ume  are soaked for a very long time. It is served in a glass, or with ice cubes, and is often diluted with water, or mixed with soda.

Umeshu is a popular drink and can be enjoyed as an aperitif, along with a dessert,or as a light digestive. It is very popular, especially with women, because its flavor is sweet and fruity.
The taste of the umeshu is refreshing and sweet

The alcohol content of umeshu is quite low, between 10% and 20%, which is why this alcohol is pleasant as an aperitif.

You can amaze your guests by combining umeshu wine with foie gras or other appetizer food. In addition, umeshu is a very fresh alcohol and very fruity tasting, so it will make an excellent base for cocktails too.

In Japan, it is a fruit liqueur that is normally used in the summer, because its flavor is refreshing and sweet. The production of umeshu traditionally starts in June and the plum fruits will be macerated for about 6 months to 1 year.

Before bottling, the plums are either removed, or left whole and sometimes transformed into purée, which will then be reintroduced into the liqueur, and this will make a liqueur called “nigori” which means “unfiltered”.

Many Japanese make their own umeshu at home. This allows you to choose the maceration time yourself, because the longer the maceration time, the more fruity the drink will, get. For a light taste, some will open their liqueur bottles only 3 months after bottling.

So, you could try to make one yourself also.

The higher the fruit content used and the longer the maceration the darker the alcohol gets at the end.

You will probably notice the different shades of alcohol you see in the grocery store. This does not mean that the dark umeshu are very strong. They’re just more fruity.

Diluted, dry or with ice, umeshu owes its success to its refreshing virtues. Despite its low 10 to 15° of alcohol, it remains indeed a very sweet and invigorating aperitif! Experts even claim that it is a healthy drink, because the citric acid and other beneficial compounds contained in umeshu and extracted into the liqueur would improve blood circulation.

Umeshu can easily be kept for 5 to 10 years, but should preferably be used right away while it’s still fresh after opening.

Note: It’s known that alcohol abuse is dangerous for your health, so consume with moderation.

Where to find umeshu in Japan?

In wedtern countries and in US you can easily find them in Japanese restaurants or in Asian grocery stores. In Japan, summer is the best season to taste it in izakaya (Japanese bars), in Japanese restaurants, or in kawayuka terraces on stilts in Kyoto.

You will find umeshu at quite cheap price in asian supermarkets, but for a quality alcohol, you should prefer purchase thru internet that will allow you to order the best bottles imported from Japan. Otherwise, many Japanese restaurants offer umeshu in their drinks menu, so feel free to ask them for advice to enjoy the full flavor of the Japanese “plum wine”.

You can even visit the Asahara fruit liqueurs distillery in Okumusashi, Saitama Prefecture, north of Tokyo. It is located near the mountains of Chichibu, where the climate and vegetation are perfect for harvesting fruit. They produce mainly unfiltered “nigori” fruit liqueurs.

You can then taste these umeshu in the famous Chawan Japanese bowls (best known in the west as used in ceremonial Matcha tea preparation) with so particular charm in a most relaxing setting.

 

Cuisine

Okonomiyaki, simple and fast Japanese Pizza recipe!

Okonomiyaki japanese pizza Osaka style

An okonomiyaki is a Japanese salted pancake or pizza very popular in Japan and especially in Osaka which is eaten as a main dish and is generally shared with several people. It’s a very full flavoured and tasty dish. You can customize it by choosing your topping (meat, fish, vegetables). Its preparation is quite simple and fast. However, you would need to have some Japanese ingredients that you can buy in Japanese grocery stores or on the internet.

The Japanese ingredients you will need for the okonomiyaki recipe are:

Ingredient for okonomiyaki pizza

1. okonomiyaki sauce, an essential ingredient in the development of a true okonomiyaki. This sauce gives the okonomiyaki all its flavour. You can buy some here.

2. Japanese mayonnaise Kewpie, it’s quite lighter than the normal mayonnaise. To purchase, follow this link.

3. Dashi powder for ease of use. You can make dashi yourself and it will only be better if you do. But if you prefer the east way or don’t have the tine you can buy Shimaya’s Dashinomoto  or some other dashi brand soup stock, which will be perfectly fine.

4. A bag of kastuobushi. It’s dried and grated Bonito in fine shavings. They add character to the ensemble and bring a very pleasant visual touch. We recommend you buy from the brand Wadakyu, produced in Japan which is good and not too expensive.

5. Aonori which will bring a very pleasant taste of algae to the okonomiyaki pizza.

We have already tried with substitute ingredients like the ordinary mayonnaise for example, but the general taste suffers. If you want to rediscover the flavors of the real okonomiyaki you absolutely need these Japanese ingredients! Now it’s time for the recipe:

Preparation 10 min  Cook 10 min  Total time 20 min

Our recipe of okonomiyaki is enough for 1 pizza/ pancake

Ingredients

  • 1 bag of katsuobushi “dried bonito”
  • 1 mayonnaise kewpie
  • 1 okonomiyaki sauce
  • aonori
  • 1 sachet of 10g dashi powder
  • 1 egg
  • 150 g of meat or fish
  • Optional slices of fat”
  • 2 leaves of chinese cabbage
  • 1/2 bag of chemical yeast
  • 100 g flour

Equipment needed:

  • Salad bowl
  • A spoon to mix
  • A spatula for okonomiyaki
  • A pan a griddle or a plancha”

Instruction

  1. In the bowl, mix the flour with the baking powder.
  2. In another bowl, heat 100 ml of water and add your dashi powder, then mix. I personally put half a pack if you want it to be more full-bodied in taste you can put 1 whole. Add this hot dashi to the flour / yeast mixture.
  3. Add the egg and stir. We get a smooth paste.
  4. Finely cut the Chinese cabbage leaves and add them to the batter.
  5. From this step you can add the filling of your choice, here from the shrimp and another to the chickens and slices of bacon. You have to mix well in the bowl.
  6. All that remains is to cook it in a frying pan or at best on a crepe or to plant it on the table. Cook the sliced bacon and place on the plate once golden.
  7. Place the okonomiyaki paste on the skillet over medium heat to Brown the surface. 5 minutes on each side is enough, see if the raw filling is cooked well.
  8. You can turn it back with your spatulas. If you don’t have one, you can always buy this set of two really top spatulas for cooking. You will facilitate the daily life.
  9. We finish with the sauces.
  10. First the okonomiyaki sauce, draw short parallel lines on the okonomiyaki. In Japan they use a broad brush and generously coat everything.
  11. Then with Kewpie mayonnaise sauce
  12. Draw parallel lines from above.
  13. If you want to make patterns with a knife, simply slide the blade from one knife to the other.
  14. Sprinkle generously with katsuobushi. Then sprinkle some aonori and it’s ready !

Good appetite!

 

Some Tips and tricks

– You could add  wasabi sauce with a light taste (after the Kewpie mayonnaise stage), we find that it brings a very interesting taste to the okonomiyaki. Even if it is not included as an ingredient in the original recipe you would certainly appreciate the addition of with this sauce!

You can add marinated red ginger “beni shoga” as garnish if you like. As a garnish idea, you can use pork, scallops, cod, chicken, beef, calamari, etc. …

The okonomiyaki must have a rather thick consistency while being mellow in the mouth. This dish is very delicious when eaten with a beer or umeshu for example!

 

Okonomiyaki, simple and fast Japanese Pizza recipe!
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 1
 
Ingredients
  • Ingredients
  • 1 bag of katsuobushi "dried bonito"
  • 1 mayonnaise kewpie
  • 1 okonomiyaki sauceaonori
  • 1 sachet of 10g dashi powder
  • 1 egg150 g of meat or fish
  • Optional slices of fat"
  • 2 leaves of chinese cabbage
  • ½ bag of chemical yeast
  • 100 g flour
  • Equipment needed:
  • Salad bowl
  • A spoon to mix
  • A spatula for okonomiyaki
  • A pan or a griddle
Instructions
  1. In the bowl, mix the flour with the baking powder.
  2. In another bowl, heat 100 ml of water and add your dashi powder, then mix. I personally put half a pack if you want it to be more full-bodied in taste you can put 1 whole.
  3. Add this hot dashi to the flour / yeast mixture.Add the egg and stir. We get a smooth paste.
  4. Finely cut the Chinese cabbage leaves and add them to the batter.
  5. From this step you can add the filling of your choice, here from the shrimp and another to the chickens and slices of bacon. You have to mix well in the bowl.
  6. All that remains is to cook it in a frying pan or at best on a crepe or to plant it on the table. Cook the sliced bacon and place on the plate once golden.
  7. Place the okonomiyaki paste on the skillet over medium heat to Brown the surface. 5 minutes on each side is enough, see if the raw filling is cooked well.
  8. You can turn it back with your spatulas. If you don't have one, you can always buy this set of two really top spatulas for cooking. You will facilitate the daily life.
  9. We finish with the sauces.
  10. First the okonomiyaki sauce, draw short parallel lines on the okonomiyaki. In Japan they use a broad brush and generously coat everything.
  11. Then with Kewpie mayonnaise sauce
  12. Draw parallel lines from above.
  13. If you want to make patterns with a knife, simply slide the blade from one knife to the other.
  14. Sprinkle generously with katsuobushi. Then sprinkle some aonori and it's ready !Good appetite!
 

Dessert #food

simple chocolate cake recipe

 

Ingredients:

  • 225 grams of wheat flour
  • 375 grams of sugar
  • 100 grams of almonds
  • 1 egg
  • 250 ml milk
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 3 tablespoons cocoa powder
  • 1 tablespoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • Salt to taste

How to Cook:

It is not necessary to use mixer and oven. Instead you can use a whisk to stir the dough. However, make sure you stir the dough evenly and thoroughly. Ensure correct mix all the ingredients evenly. The oven function can be replaced by using a Teflon or fry pan. Use the following steps to create a simple chocolate cake recipe :

1. Put all the ingredients needed except almonds into the basin of moderate size.
2. Stir all ingredients using a whisk until the batter evenly.
3. Slice almonds thinly, toasted, and then mix in the batter.
4. Return stir almonds mixed dough evenly.
5. Prepare a Teflon non-stick fry pan complete with glass lid.
6. Apply Teflon with vegetable oil to taste.
7. Pour the cake batter into the Teflon and cook over low heat for 20 minutes.
8. Lift the cake after cooled and out of Teflon.
9. Use whipped cream, grease the steamed chocolate cake that has been cold with whipped cream.
10. Chocolate cake is ready to be served.

food #Recipes

Spice Crusted Salmon Recipe

About Safe Seafood

Seafood is still a superfood, although we have to be more selective about the kinds we eat due to over fishing and problems with polluted waterways. Wild Alaskan salmon is one of the cleanest fish you can eat, far more nutritious than Atlantic or farmed salmon.

Still crazy about salmon after all these years

Wild Alaskan Salmon is one of my favorite foods. Here’s a recipe I’ve made twice so far, once in January and again today. I pan fried the salmon in Ahuacatlan Avocado Oil that I got from a vendor at the Town & Country Farmers’ Market. I’ll tell you more about the virtues of avocado oil in the next couple of weeks. You’ll have a chance to enter to win a bottle of this oil as well. It’s a great all purpose oil rich in monounsaturated fatty acids and far safer for cooking and salad use than vegetable oils.

Now forward to the recipe :).

Spice Crusted Salmon

Prep: 15 minutes Cooking: 8 to 12 minutes Yield: 4 servings

I found this recipe in Healing Foods: Cooking for Celiacs, Colitis, Crohn’s and IBS by Sandra Ramacher. Even if you don’t have digestive disorders, I highly recommend this cookbook. It has some amazing recipes. I’ve tried at least three of them so far and they’ve all been winners.

My notes: I doubled the amount of spices and sesame seeds to make enough to coat both sides of the salmon fillets. I cooked enough fish to allow for leftovers the next day and two pieces to freeze for future meals.

Ingredients:
1½ tablespoons whole dried coriander seeds*
1 tablespoon dried cumin seeds*
1 tablespoon sesame seeds* (I used black sesame seeds today; brown ones last time)
¼ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon black pepper
4 salmon fillets with skin on one side (I used FishHugger salmon)
1 egg white
Olive oil (I used 2 tablespoons avocado oil, which has a higher smoke point than olive oil; Spectrum Palm shortening, Tropical Traditions Palm Shortening, and ghee also work well)

*seeds are only for advanced stage of the Specific Carbohydrate Diet and need to be crushed finely.

Heat a dry skillet; toast the coriander seeds and cumin seeds, stirring constantly until they become fragrant. Remove seeds. Repeat the process with the sesame seeds. Remove from heat, add to the spices, and crush with a mortar and pestle (or pulse on and off in a spice-dedicated coffee grinder).
Add the thyme, salt and black pepper.

Dip the skin side of the salmon fillets into the egg white. Then press into the spice mixture. (I dipped both sides of the fish into the egg and spice mixture, so I needed more coating.)
Brush the skillet with olive oil and bring to a high heat. (I oiled the pan more liberally)
Place the fillets with the seeded side onto the oil (start with the flesh side, then flip to the skin side for the pretties presentation).

Fry on high for two minutes.(I used medium high heat for about 3 minutes per side.) Turn the heat to low. Flip the fillets and cook on low for up to 8 minutes, depending on how well done you would like them.
Serve with our asparagus with hazelnut butter and sautéed Asian greens. (I served my favorite: blanched vegetables).

Cuisine #Recipes

Japanese Shirataki Noodles -The Feast from the East!

 

Welcome to the home of the shirataki noodles, a traditional Japanese fare that is quickly taking the West by storm. If you’ve never tried these delicious noodles then you’re missing out on a gastronomical voyage that may change your pallet forever. Perfect for those who can’t consumer gluten, don’t want to ingest carbohydrates, or simply would love to lose weight, these noodles afford an incredible array of cooking options for extremely reasonable prices. If you’ve been looking all over your town and simply can’t find them, check out one of the leading online repositories of shirataki noodles at Miracle Noodles. They have worldwide shipping so you can receive their product no matter where you’re located!

Still confused over what shirataki noodles even are? That’s totally okay! Though they’ve been consumed in Japan for generations, much of the western world has had limited to absolutely no contact with this incredible noodle. You won’t find them in most grocery stores and may have to hunt far and wide to find them in a physical store. The best way for you to find them these days is through an online dealer who will be able to ship the product directly to your home. In this method you’ll be able to get your shirataki noodles for a highly competitive price and won’t even have to leave your apartment to satisfy your shirataki noodle fix.

Are shirataki noodles for everyone?

It’s hard to say for this one. Shirataki noodles are definitely an excellent product for most people, especially since they don’t contain any gluten or soy, but they may be a bit strange for some. The Japanese have been eating shirataki noodles for generations without any problem, but sometimes these cultural differences just don’t translate.

You may want to sample a small bit of shirataki noodles before really diving in. If the shirataki noodles have a real impact on your digestive system then they simply may not be for you. Remember, don’t be put off by the odor of the shirataki noodle liquid. This is absolutely normal and has nothing to do with the quality of your shirataki noodles.

So sample some shirataki noodles and see how your body processes them. More likely than not you’ll notice some small changes, but this is probably only because shirataki noodles contain so much fiber and will really change your digestive system. Chances are you haven’t been ingesting enough fiber and the shirataki noodles are actually just doing wonders for your system.

Buy your shirataki noodles today!

Go sample some shirataki noodles and experience this real gastronomical marvel. You’ll be able to experience pasta on a level you never imagined with shirataki noodles. Try them with all of your favorites and you’re sure to become a shirataki noodle convert!

The Magical Miracle Shirataki Noodles

Miracle Noodles is another name for the popular Shirataki noodles. This is not a new product and this has been prevalent in the Asian countries for years.

The Japanese women have relied on this magical noodle variety for over two thousand years to stay slim, healthy and lose weight. If you ever ask the Japanese women for the secret of their healthy and slim body, they will surely tell you about the Miracle Noodles and how they have used it to stay slim. Miracle noodles and weight loss go together when you are on a weight loss diet plan.

Shirataki and Dietary Fiber

We, the people of the western countries know the benefits of dietary fibers and their role in maintaining good health and also for staying slim. But we fail to include enough of it in our diet. The Shirataki Miracle noodle is mainly composed of this essential dietary soluble fiber. They have zero calories, which mean no calories. When you consume Shirataki noodles, there are no calories that find way into your body system and the simple fibers carry out the function of absorption and break down of cholesterol in the body.

Shirataki Low Carb Diet

Miracle Shirataki noodles is produced from a polysaccharide known as Glucomannan. Glucomannan is widely accepted in use as nutritional supplement as it is a dietary fiber. The main reason why people consume dietary fiber on a daily basis is to relieve from constipation. Dieters who are on a low carbohydrate high protein diet have to find some alternative dietary fiber source and Glucomannan supplements serve the purpose. It also performs other useful changes for the human body.

Shirataki is Fat, Starch and Gluten Free

There are several kinds of diets being used by people to lose weight and all of them have the basic focus on reduced calorie intake. Shirataki noodles have zero calories and low carbohydrate content. They are high in dietary fiber and therefore form the best food while on a diet. They will not add to the calorie intake and yet give a stomach full feeling. You can now fight your hunger cravings easily without exceeding the daily calorie limit. They do not contain fat, gluten or starch. Dieters on gluten free diet plan keep searching for gluten free foods and these noodles can be made a part of the daily meal plan.

Truly a Miracle Noodle

It is in recent times that this Shirataki Miracle Noodles is gaining its popularity in the western countries even though it has been used in the Japanese world for over centuries. This popularity is mainly based on the recent findings and proofs for the high efficiency of Miracle Noodles in weight loss and other health benefits.

The manufacturers of Shirataki ’Miracle’ Noodles have customized their noodles to suit those dieters who look for low calorie high dietary fiber containing foods to serve the role while on a strict diet regimen. The advantages of including this fiber substitute in your diet plan are numerous and you can realize it by yourself once you add it into your daily diet plan. Doctors and experts recommend that the body be supplied with the all the essential components while on a diet plan as depriving any component will affect the body adversely.

What’s a serving?
Each package contained 1-1/3 cups of pasta. The company considers this 3 servings. For a couple of my tastings I figured 2 servings per package. A couple times I ate the entire package in one sitting with my meat and vegetable side dishes. I felt satisfied but not stuffed.

FYI: The Miracle Noodles require special handling detailed on the Miracle Noodle web site—including tips for dry roasting in a skillet for a minute so that the noodles will be completely dry and will better absorb the flavor of whatever you add to them.


How you prepare the noodles?

1. Open the package over a colander (they’re packed in water). Don’t freak out if you detect a slightly fishy odor. That’s normal. It’s from the natural calcium additive they add to the water in the bag to keep the noodles’ shape intact.
2.  Rinse with warm water for approximately 2 to 4 minutes. This eliminates the smell.
3.  Pat dry with a paper towel or small hand towel or dry roast, which only takes a minute or two, to ensure that the noodles will absorb the flavor of what you add to them.

How to dry roast the noodles
The company recommends this procedure to thoroughly dry the noodles before adding a warm or chilled sauce or other flavored ingredients.

1.  Heat a cast iron or non-stick skillet with a little olive oil or cooking spray over high heat.
2.  Add the shirataki noodles and dry roast for about 1 minutes
3.  When the noodles are dry you may hear a speaking noise as you move them.
4.  Drizzle with a little oil or not, or add the stock or sauce you plan to use with a recipe.


If you want to cook the Miracle Noodles

Add them to your sauce, stir fry or other dish at the end of your preparation process.  Heat the noodles for no more than 3 to 5 minutes.  The thicker shape shirataki noodles such as fettucini, rigatoni, lasagna, can withstand more heat than the angel hair, but you still want to watch them. Extended cooking can adversely effect the texture.

Your turn
Let me know what you think if you try their products when you try them. If you try the Miracle Noodles, let me know what you think. I’d love to hear from you.

Note here

Please do note that you should consult your doctor or dietician before you go for any dietary weight loss program. The manufacture optimally advise the inclusion of Miracle noodles as a daily meal program as a replacement for one of the three main meals. Try the Shirataki Miracle Noodles today by clicking the link below.

 

Cuisine #Recipes

Black Rice Tofu Recipe

Black Rice Tofu photo

Photo by tinyfroglet

(vegan)

Looking back through my blog’s recipe entries, I think it’s becoming pretty obvious I have a thing for Asian food. It all started when I first started cooking at about age 10. I’d come home from school and head straight for the packaged 10 cent ramen noodles, adding my own fresh vegetables to them, and thinking I was the gourmet shit!

This black rice and tofu dish was a rather whimsical experiment. I’ve had the rice in my pantry for a while, just waiting for the right time and inspiration to fool with it. Chinese black rice, also known as Chinese Forbidden black rice, is a gorgeous short-grain glutenous rice with a sweet flavor and chewy texture. It turns indigo or deep purple in its cooking liquid and smells slightly grape-like. It can be used for both sweet and savory dishes.

This week at the Fresh Market, I zealously grabbed about 5 pounds of some lovely organic roma tomatoes since I’m pretty sure that these opportunities will be few and far between as we near summer’s end. I know I’ve said this before, but those babies are the absolute perfect cooking tomato, uplifting anything they touch with an incredibly sweet and rich tomatoey dimension. There is nothing else quite like it. Although many people don’t think of using tomatoes in Asian cooking, it is actually quite common in Szechuan cuisine and throughout Southern China, and Malaysia. Tomatoes and five-spice? Hmmmmm….

When it comes to five-spice powder (typically a blend of fennel, star anise, cinnamon, cloves, and white pepper), it’s not on my top 10 list of turn-to Asian spices or condiments. As a matter of fact, any that I’ve bought in the past would just go to waste since I’d use it only once and the whole bottle would end up being shoved to the back of my spice drawer left to go stale. Well, I got a five-spice itch and imagined searing some tofu that had been coated with it, and somehow incorporating those amazing tomatoes.

So as it came together: I took a few romas, quarted them, and marinated them in equal parts of hoisin and Chinese chili sauce, minced garlic, and grated ginger. I let them sit and smolder in all those wonderful flavors for about 30 minutes.

Some dehydrated shitake mushroom caps were reconstituted in hot water and then cut into quarters.

I cut extra-firm organic tofu into 1 1/2 inch filets, placed them between kitchen towels, and squeezed for about 30 minutes with the weight of a cast iron skillet placed on top to remove all excess water. I then sprinkled them with shoyu, followed by a liberal coating of five-spice powder, seared them in a wok with grapeseed oil, and removed them to cool before being cut into triangles.

To prepare the rice, I sauteed a cup with olive oil, a dash of shoyu, and minced garlic in the bottom of a Le Creuset pot (I had to mention Le Creuset, I am so proud of my collection!) then simmered it with vegetable broth for about 35 minutes. Once finished, I added some diced green onions.

Finally, in a hot wok with the same grapeseed oil used to sear the tofu, I added the tomatoes and their marinade, plus the quartered shitake caps, and stir fried just until the tomatoes began to soften and release their juices. I added the tofu back in and gave it a quick stir to bring all flavors together.

After plating the rice and tomatoes, I garnished with some chopped cilantro.

The verdict? This is one of my most successful experiments. Five-spice powder will no longer go to waste! It went perfectly with the richness of the tomatoes, the meatiness of the tofu’s texture, and chewy shitakes. The hoisin-chili marinade was both sweet and spicy, but not too stingy-spicy, just a nice warmth throughout my mouth. Hoisin sauce and romas really love each other! The black rice was just an added interesting and exotic dimension. YUM!